Low Sun And Long Shadows: Sunday 22 January (365.360° Day 201)


There was some beautiful light around early afternoon and the very scenic Ashton Lane in the West End seemed the perfect location to capitalise on it.

While there, I got chatting to Colin, a fellow street photographer who I’ve met a few times briefly before when I’ve (in the day job) had stuff in the local papers he shoots for. His photo-a-day challenge is here and is well worth checking out.

These are the first images I’ve processed with some specialist B&W software called Silver Efex Pro 2, which is near enough the best thing ever. Very much looking forward to working with it more. I just need to work out which bank I can rob to buy it when my trial period ends in a fortnight…

photography photo picture image glasgow scotland street photography city urban bw black and white B&W mono monochrome nikon d700 project365 365project photo a day sunset low sun natural light backlit split-toning ashton lane west end hillhead fairy lights lines contrast

photography photo picture image glasgow scotland street photography city urban bw black and white B&W mono monochrome nikon d700 project365 365project photo a day sunset low sun natural light split-toning shadow silhouette ashton lane west end hillhead cobbles cobblestones stones contrast

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16 thoughts on “Low Sun And Long Shadows: Sunday 22 January (365.360° Day 201)

  1. Both are great, but I do love the second. Your blog always makes me want to try out bw shots, but I love my colour so much… maybe I just need to find the right things to shoot.. 🙂

    • Thanks Cin! Shooting in black & white is great fun and a brilliant way to improve your overall techniques. It’s striking, arty, timeless and – for many subjects – it just works. To some extent though you do need to ‘learn’ to shoot and see in black and white.

      There are few things to keep in mind, and there are several good articles out there outlining some of these fundamental points. Here’s one: http://www.hongkiat.com/blog/five-essential-tips-to-black-white-photography/

      Composition, as always, is key. Contrast, texture and tone are also crucial. Learning to see in tones really helps (I’m still on a journey with this!). Some colours just don’t work together or create as much impact in mono images. For example, red and green, as complimentary colours, are brilliant together in colour photography. The classic field of wild poppies perhaps the best example. In B&W conversions reds and greens have a very similar tonal value so they just merge together so much more than in colour and we lose a lot of contrast and impact.

      B&W shots can often look more striking as they actually welcome the contrast within the image being pushed a lot further than it could in a colour image. Overly contrast-y colour images look weird and overcooked. High contrast B&W images can really pack a punch.

      Finally, don’t shoot in your camera’s B&W mode, shoot in colour and convert afterwards, ideally in a specialist B&W program but if not, there are a wide range of ways to convert to mono in photoshop – read up on them online and pick the method that works for you.

      Go for it and happy shooting! : )

    • Thanks Lisa. Before using Silver Efex I was working in Adobe Camera Raw, converting to B&W and using the colour sliders, levels and curves to process my images. Works fine but Silver Efex is an absolute beaut – it just gives you so much minute control over the conversion. Definitely recommend trying it out!

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